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The Bible Is Historically Accurate

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The Bible Is Historically Accurate

In my previous blog, I began to share with you, sources (aside from the Bible) that help me to trust in the reliability of the Bible with you. (If you missed it, go back and read, How Can You Trust the Bible? here.

As I mentioned before, historians must use very exact standards in order to prove the authenticity of any historical document:

  • There must be other eyewitness accounts: (not hearsay)
  • Were there other writers of that era who can authentic this story?

There must be multiple copies of manuscripts.

The original works of antiquity from Greek/Roman philosophers have not survived. So how do we know if the writings we attribute to Homer, as an example, are actually Homer’s writings?  Well, manuscripts – copies of the originals that still exist.

The most trusted work from Greek antiquity is Homer’s Illiad. So how many copies of The Illiad are known to exist in museums today? 1,827. Does that mean when I go online and download a copy of The Illiad I can trust it is accurate? YES. Why? Because 1,827 manuscripts exist today.

How many manuscripts of the Bible are known to exist today? Drum roll please! 66,420!

In 1947, shepherd boys near the Dead Sea found hundreds of jars of scripture from Ezekiel and Jeremiah. When they unrolled them, they were accurate to the texts we have today!

When I go online and download a copy of the Bible, I trust that it is accurate because 66,420 manuscripts still exist!

You can listen to this message here on Lakeview’s podcast.

 

 

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About Ron Bontrager

Lead Pastor of Lakeview Church in Indianapolis.

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